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Andy Roddick, Andy Murray bounced from Queen’s Club

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Andy Roddick

Andy Roddick has gone 0-6 since beating Roger Federer in Miami. (Getty Images)

LONDON — It was not a good day to be an Andy in London.

Andy Roddick and Andy Murray, who together have won six of the last nine titles at the AEGON Championships, suffered surprising second-round losses at the Queen’s Club in London. Despite serving 79 percent for the match, hitting 22 aces, and holding a match point, Roddick was knocked out by Edouard Roger-Vasselin, 6-4, 4-6, 7-5. Roddick is now 0-6 since beating Roger Federer in Miami in April, but said afterwards the match was a clear improvement from how he had been playing before.

“It wasn’t that bad. I served 80 percent and had 22 aces. It was better than what I have been doing. I thought I had a look there in the third set, and honestly I felt like I was going to take that thing once I turned it. Didn’t work out that way.”

Earlier this week, Roddick was quoted as saying Wimbledon 2012 could be his last. Speaking to The Daily Mail, Roddick acknowledged the possibility. “Do I think this could be my last Wimbledon? Possibly … but that’s so much of an unknown.’” Those quotes were spun into an Andy Roddick retirement story, and when asked about them after his match, Roddick said he was misinterpreted.

“I didn’t really say anything. I mean, I’m not at the point where I’m going to deal in absolutes with my career. I’m not going to sit here and say, I’m going to play three more years. At this point anything is a possibility. It’s something I said. I don’t think what was said and the way it has been interpreted is completely on the same page.

“I don’t have certainty two, three years down the road. I’m not going to talk about that. I don’t think I’m going wet the precedent on giving up dates on a day-to-day basis, either.”

Roddick hasn’t ruled out the possibility of taking a wildcard into next week’s tournament in Eastbourne or playing an exhibition event in hopes of getting some more match play before Wimbledon. Once again, he’s trying to walk a fine line between trying to stay healthy and not risk getting injured, while at the same time needing to play tournaments and get some matches and confidence. It’s not easy, but that’s been the story of Roddick’s 2012 so far.

The story of Nicolas Mahut’s 2012 so far is that he’s fast becoming an Andy-upset specialist. After beating Roddick in the first round at Roland Garros, Mahut now gets the biggest scalp of his career in beating Murray, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (1). Murray seemed unsure of his footing for much of the match and let the aggressive Frenchman dictate play on his favorite surface. Because of the rainy weather in London, the players haven’t had much time to adjust their movement to grass, and for a defensive-minded player like Murray, it was obvious.

So is Murray ready to panic as he heads into what is for him, the most important tournament of the year?

“Oh, panic stations. I’ve just got no chance to be ready for Wimbledon now. It’s going to be impossible, I think.”

And yes, as evidenced by the “(Smiling)” notation in the interview transcript, he was being sarcastic.

  • Published On Jun 13, 2012
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