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Video: Lukas Rosol hits tweener winner in Davis Cup for Czech Republic

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Given the ubiquitous nature of the “tweener” — it seems not a day goes by that an ATP player doesn’t attempt one — it takes a pretty spectacular one to make us sit up and take notice these days. So kudos to you, Lukas Rosol. I’m sitting up and taking notice.

Rosol, who got the nod to play the Czech Republic’s opening Davis Cup rubber after Radek Stepanek withdrew to have neck surgery, hit this fantastic sharp-angled “tweener” for a winner against Switzerland’s Stanislas Wawrinka. He had a good amount of time to set up, but to hit that angle was pretty special.

Unfortunately for Rosol and the defending champions, it wasn’t enough. Wawrinka, who looked like a man still riding the wave of confidence gained from his five-set effort against Novak Djokovic at the Australian Open, won 6-4, 6-3, 6-4. With Tomas Berdych defeating Henri Laaksonen in the second match, the teams are tied 1-1 heading into Saturday’s doubles.

  • Published On Feb 01, 2013
  • 2 comments
    max6
    max6

    I like Lucas since he defeated Rafa,he showed that the win was not a fluke.He is an extremely  talented player.This tweener is a definitive proof. Congratulation !

    Michael9
    Michael9

    That's a sensational tweener, and will probably be one of the ten best shots of the year.

     

    On another issue: the Swiss people really don't care much about Davis Cup. Only 3,000 tickets (in a 4,000 seat arena) were sold for Switzerland's tie in Geneva against the Davis Cup champions Czech Republic. Even Wawrinka's heroics against Djokovic in Australia and the venue in the largest Swiss-French city (Wawrinka is Swiss-French) has not attracted more Swiss ticket-buyers.

    http://www.blick.ch/sport/tennis/verband-verliert-wegen-federer-eine-million-id2188773.html

     

    While the Swiss really don't care for Davis Cup, they do care for when Federer plays. In July 2011, when Federer played Davis Cup against unheralded Portugal, "most of the 8,000 spectators in the home arena of the SC Bern ice hockey team had made the trip to the capital to see Federer".

     

    No wonder two thirds of Swiss people polled last October indicated they respect Federer's decision not to play Davis Cup.

     

    Without Federer playing, the Swiss tennis federation loses 1 million Swiss francs (1.1 million US dollars) of revenue from loss of TV coverage, sponsors and ticket sales. This supposedly translates to a loss of 150,000 to 200,000 Swiss francs to the Swiss tennis federation for hosting the tie.  On the other hand, had Federer played, the Swiss tennis federation would have made a "juicy profit" of about 700,000 Swiss francs.

     

    The bruhaha about Federer not playing Davis Cup was ultimately about money. The Swiss tennis federation has been using Federer as a product to generate profits for their organization and to pay its executive and employees. After playing 22 ties (58 matches) for Switzerland -- one of the most ever Davis Cup matches played by a great player -- Federer's appearances have made many millions for the Swiss tennis federation. Yet the Swiss tennis federation expects Federer to be the gift that keeps on giving.

     

    Federer has played so much Davis Cup that he will be receiving the Davis Cup Commitment Award. This Award is presented by the ITF to players who have shown long-standing dedication to representing their country in Davis Cup and competed in a minimum of 20 home or away ties over their career. Federer needs to play just 12 more matches (four to five more ties) to equal Stefan Edberg as the great player has been most dedicated to Davis Cup (Stefan Edberg, John McEnroe, Mats Wilander and Boris Becker are the only four great players -- with at least five grand slam titles -- who who have played more Davis Cup matches than Federer in 100 years of Davis Cup history). 

    http://www.daviscup.com/en/history/commitment-award.aspx