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Daily Bagel: Video: Roger Federer angered by chair umpire at Indian Wells

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The Daily Bagel is your dose of the interesting reporting, writing and quipping from around the Internet.

• Video: It’s rare that you see Roger Federer get peeved by umpiring, but he wasn’t having it during his fourth-round win over Stanislas Wawrinka on Wednesday. Federer called out the supervisor after umpire Steve Ulrich Fergus Murphy disallowed a Hawk-Eye challenge on Federer’s serve. Though I’m not too keen on a player challenging his own serve that was called in, I have to side with Federer here. Ulrich should have given him the challenge. The point happened way too quickly.

• As we prepare for the 29th edition of Roger Federer vs. Rafael Nadal on Thursday night, here are 10 memorable points from their rivalry.

Federer-Nadal preview

• Nice find from Bryan Armen Graham: Anyone up for a Federer-Nadal drinking game? Might I recommend very, very, very small sips.

• U.S. Davis Cup captain Jim Courier wants John Isner and Sam Querrey to ditch the negative body language and become “street fighters.”

“I don’t love that in any player, let alone players that play for the United States. I’m more of a believer of faking it if you’re not feeling good than showing someone that you’re down,” Courier said during a conference call.

“I know everyone’s different. You can’t expect everyone to just immediately snap-to when you ask them to put up a little bit more of a street-fighter front.

“But I’d like our guys to be more street fighters on our team. I like them to walk around with their chests out. Sam and John can absolutely bulldoze almost any player on tour if they’re playing well.

Murray rips opponent’s grunting

• From Reuters, Tracy Austin talks about the tough expectations for young talent in American tennis.

“We don’t want someone who is top 20, we want someone who is winning grand slams and those are big shoes to fill. When Serena retires, it’s going to be a very sad day.”

Asked why the production line of U.S. champions had slowed in recent years, Austin replied: “It’s just globalization. Who’d have thought that you would have three players from Serbia, either at number one or winning grand slams in recent years?

“Who would have thought there would be two top women players from Belgium, which is such a small country? The game has become so global now that you have to share the mantle with everybody else.”

• Non-tennis: If you’re freaking out like I am about the news that Google is shutting down its RSS Reader service, here are some alternatives via LifeHacker.

Del Potro eyes meeting with new pope

  • Published On Mar 14, 2013
  • 2 comments
    rubberedge
    rubberedge

    Roddick has already done this before, and he was allowed to challenge.

    robbati21
    robbati21

    I don't believe that is Steve Ulrich. Also, I've always thought, from having played juniors, that a serve can't have any say whatsoever in whether his own first serve was in or out, if it was originally called in. I always remember bullish and intimidating opponents who questioned every call would equally get angry if I gave a serve the benefit of the doubt and played it, while my opponent, thinking it was out, would just stand there. Out of good sportsmanship, I would let them hit a second serve, but I was always under the impression that technically a server couldn't "call" his or her own first serve out. What's more, I've never seen a pro try to challenge a serve in his or her favor until Federer did last night. Can we get an official ruling on this?