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Andy Murray blasts judge’s decision in Operation Puerto doping case

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Andy Murray

Andy Murray fell to No. 3 in the ATP rankings with an early loss at Monte Carlo. (Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

Andy Murray says the Spanish court’s decision to allow for the destruction of more than 200 blood bags in the Operation Puerto doping case is one big cover-up.

Spanish doctor Eufemiano Fuentes, at the heart of cycling’s doping scandal, was found guilty Tuesday of endangering public health. His sentence was, to put it lightly, lenient. He was given a one-year suspended jail sentence, banned from practicing medicine and fined $6,000. With the case concluded, the judge ordered the blood bags obtained in the investigation be destroyed.

Tweeting for just the fourth time in 2013, Murray was highly critical of the court’s decision.

Ana Munoz, the head of Spain’s antidoping agency, told reporters that she would appeal the decision to destroy the evidence.

  • Published On May 01, 2013
  • 6 comments
    PabloEnriqueArias
    PabloEnriqueArias

    This is a criminal trial for health reasons. Not a sport trial about doping. Spanish sporting authorities don't have any saying in criminal cases.The one asking to destroy the blood bags is the judge, and he wants to do that because they are not of any use in the trial after the veredict, and because when the bags were collected doping wasn't a crime. Most people in Spain want the bags to be analyzed and I would love to know the names of the cheaters, but they are protected by the fact that if something is not a crime when you do it,  then justice won't investigate it. An the Spanish legal system is "garantista", it puts the legal rights of the accused before any practical sense of justice. Much more if you haven't even been accused.Mr. Fuentes can, if he wants, declare who were his customers. But the trial wasn't about that.And everybody could have known that from the very beginning. 

    dami1
    dami1

    Shame on you Spain! Is there anything more to say?.. The doctor acknowledged that he did help other athletes, not only in tennis, but then, the normal thing for Spanish sporting authorities and the media (who, for sure, didn't complain about it) seems to ask him to shut the f... up and, on this particular case, destroy the proofs!!! This country has lost all credibility. 

    dami1
    dami1

    @PabloEnriqueArias

     "when the bags were collected doping wasn't a crime" LoooooooL !

    You'll find any excuse to support them, wouldn't you? For your information, the French anti-doping agency keeps the blood samplings refrigerated for 10 years. Why? Because we know the most recent doping substances we can't track today could be in the future.

     

    PabloEnriqueArias
    PabloEnriqueArias

    You don't get it, do you? I'm not supporting them, as you can easily read in my message. I'm saying that it is a CRIMINAL case, not a sport case. The Spanish anti-doping agency does exactly like the French or any other agency. But the bags DON'T BELONG TO THE AGENCY. They are proof in a health safety case, and were confiscated by the police just as proof in that case, and not as anything else. The sport authorities (Spanish, or anywhere) don't have the right to obligate anyone to give them the bags, and the judge can't punish anyone for doping. The sporting authorities can suspend Mr. Fuentes (as they have done) but if he doesn't want to give them the names of the dopers, there is nothing more they can do. And the judge can't give the blood samples to anyone just because they don't like doping. Again, it is a criminal trial, where the accused can be condemned to jail and fines as the penal code says, and not to give the proofs to third parties. In Spain, even the guilty have rights. Do they have rights in your country?

    PabloEnriqueArias
    PabloEnriqueArias

    If you have a better judiciary (which you might, I won't say the Spanish system is the best in the world) it is not because of the understanding that you (don't) have of the difference between criminal law and sport regulations, and the idea you have that judges can (and even, should) be pressured to condemn people for something that is not in the law.

    dami1
    dami1

     @PabloEnriqueArias Oh yes, we do have rights in France, and a better judiciary I'm afraid! Dr Fuentes has publicly said that he has worked for lots of athletes, in different sports. Trying to find excuses to this judge, saying that this criminal case is over is just lame! It is the job of a judge to do everything he can to serve justice. You'd better ask yourself why this judge doesn't want the truth to be told, who did put the pressure on him, because this is what is at stakes now. Nadal and other players are condemning the judge's move but there are still blind fans believing everybody's clean in Spain. Go figure!..