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Roger Federer switching back to old racket through the U.S. Open

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Roger Federer said that he will do some racket testing at a later date. (Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

Roger Federer said that he will do some racket testing at a later date. (Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

MASON, Ohio — After opening his title defense at the Western & Southern Open with a 6-3, 7-6 (7) win over Philipp Kohlschreiber on Tuesday night, Roger Federer confirmed that he has decided to switch back to his 90-square inch racket frame.

Federer suffered his worst loss at a Grand Slam in over 10 years at Wimbledon, losing to 116th-ranked Sergiy Stakhovsky in the second round. After that loss, Federer decided to shake things up and began testing a new Wilson prototype with a larger 98-square inch frame. He played with the blacked-out racket at two clay tournaments in Hamburg, Germany and Gstaad, Switzerland, and though he told reporters on Saturday that he intended to continue to use the new frame, he was spotted practicing with his old K-Factor Six One earlier this week in Cincinnati.

“I just felt like, you know what, I’m going to play with the old racquet through the US Open right now, and I’m going to do more racquet testing when I have, again, some more time after the U.S. Open,” Federer told reporters after his opening-round victory. “Yeah, I was playing for a month with the black one, but it’s a prototype. At the end, I just felt like, you know what, right now I feel like I need to simplify everything and just play with what I know best.”

Federer will play either Tommy Haas or Marcel Granollers in the third round, with a potential quarterfinal clash against Rafael Nadal looming.

  • Published On Aug 14, 2013
  • 1 comments
    bcrd500
    bcrd500

    It is probably a smart move to use the racket, he has played with since 2002. If Federer was going to change rackets, it would been best to make that move three to four years ago. His problem now is age and a new larger racket is not going to fix losing a half step and slower reflexes. Connors and McEnroe slowly saw their rankings slip during the 1980s as they aged but still remained in the top ten until roughly age 35 (Connors was 7 at 36 and McEnore slid from 4 to 14 between ages 28-34 and Federer is a much better player than both of them.He should remain a force on the tour for the next several years, though grand slams are probably out of reach.