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ATP rankings: Roger Federer drops to No. 8; Stanislas Wawrinka up to third

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Roger Federer

Roger Federer is ranked as low as eighth for the first time since Oct. 28, 2002. (Mal Fairclough/AFP/Getty Images)

Roger Federer has slipped to No. 8 in this week’s ATP Tour rankings, his lowest position since October 2002.

Federer fell two spots despite matching last year’s semifinal appearance at the Australian Open. The previous No. 8, Stanislas Wawrinka, leapfrogged Federer and others after winning the Australian Open. Wawrinka jumped to a career-high No. 3, replacing Federer as the Swiss No. 1 and settling in behind No. 1 Rafael Nadal and No. 2 Novak Djokovic.

WTA rankings: Li closes in on No. 2

Federer wasn’t the only member of the Big Four to tumble. Andy Murray also dropped two spots, to No. 6, after losing to Federer in the quarterfinals in Melbourne. Murray is out of the top five for the first time since August 2008. No. 4 Juan Martin del Potro and No. 5 David Ferrer now round out the top five.

In other rankings news:

• Grigor Dimitrov moved up from No. 22 to a career-high No. 19 after making his first Grand Slam quarterfinal.

• Stephane Robert, who reached the fourth round of the Australian Open as a lucky loser, rose 41 spots, from No. 119 to No. 78.

• Donald Young is up to No. 79 after a third-round run, his highest ranking since July 2012.

Here’s an explanation of the ATP’s rankings system:

The Emirates ATP Rankings period is the immediate past 52 weeks. … The year-end Emirates ATP Rankings is based on calculating, for each player, his total points from the four (4) Grand Slams, the eight (8) mandatory ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments and the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals of the ranking period, and his best six (6) results from all ATP World Tour 500, ATP World Tour 250, ATP Challenger Tour and Futures tournaments.

  • Published On Jan 27, 2014
  • 6 comments
    jay0337
    jay0337

    I think Federer is playing better than how he has been playing in the last year or year and half and the new racket seems to be working for him. I guess ranking is the last thing anybody should be looking at. If he plays the way he did at the Australian open, he is going to win some tournaments this year and he may even sneak in a slam if the draw works for him and some of the top contenders lose. He just needs to be more consistent in his ground strokes especially against the top 10 players.


    On a side note, it is exciting to see more players breaking through the big four barrier...I think its going to make tennis all the more exciting and fun to watch

    JBub
    JBub

    @jay0337Much as I admire Roger, and believe me it's a lot, he is simply succumbing to Old Man Time. If he gets to a major final this year, I will relish the moment (as no doubt he will) and will root for him, but now I think that would be something only to wish and not to expect.

    realist3
    realist3

    @jay0337I disagree with you with regard to Fed "just" needing to be more consistent in his ground strokes.  He's so used to relying on his talent but he can't do that anymore because he's lost some of his quickness. Didn't you see how against Rafa he was consistently late getting to the ball? Anyone who can make him run now has a good chance to beat him.  Don't get me wrong he's still a great player but his ranking is appropriate.  Even if he gets better with the new racket he can't make up for the loss of quickness.

    bcrd500
    bcrd500

    @realist3@jay0337 People do not want to accept that Federer's problem is not conditioning or consistency but age. He is 32 1/2 years-old and his loss of quickness was really apparent last year and is not going to get better. He simply cannot get to the ball fast enough any longer and that aspect will continue to erode with each passing month. 

    Federer was one of the three best players to ever play tennis but age is slowly stripping him of his skills.

    CMassrey
    CMassrey

    @realist3, Fed is indeed playing much better right now than in 2013 (he's #3 in the year-to-date points).  And since the USO, he's made at least the SFs of every event, so I highly doubt he sees the current #8 as any kind of tragedy.  Is he the same player as 2006?  No, but now that he's fit, there's no reason he won't continue to play better and better as he gets more used to his new racquet.  Yes... his movement is paramount to being successful, but I can see him stringing together many matches to win some tournaments this year.